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Recourse against the Arbitral Award:  

Most murkier aspect of the arbitration is the recourse to the arbitral award made by an arbitrator. The Arbitration & Conciliation, 1996 act has narrowed down the scope of interference with the award passed by the arbitrator.

Section 34 of The Arbitration & Conciliation, 1996 provides for recourse to the arbitrator award. 

Section34. Application for setting aside arbitral award—

(1) Recourse to a court against an arbitral award may be made only by an application for setting aside such award in accordance with Sub-section (2) and Sub-section (3). 

(2) An arbitral award may be set aside by the court only if—

(a) the party making the application furnishes proof that- (i) a party was under some incapacity, or (ii) the arbitration agreement is not valid under the law to which the parties have subjected it or, failing any indication thereon, under the law for the time being in force; or (iii) the party making the application was not given proper notice of the appointment of an arbitrator or of the arbitral or was otherwise unable to present his case; or (iv) the arbitral award deals with a dispute not contemplated by or not falling within the terms of the submission to arbitration, or it contains decisions on matters beyond the scope of the submission to arbitration; Provided that, if the decisions on matters submitted to arbitration can be separated from those not so submitted, only that part of the arbitral award which contains decisions on matters not submitted to arbitration may be set aside; or (v) the composition of the arbitral tribunal or the arbitral procedure was not in accordance with the agreement of the parties, unless such agreement was in conflict with a provision of this Part from which the parties cannot derogate or, failing such agreement, was not in accordance with this Part; or 

(b) the court finds that-- (i) the subject-matter of the dispute is not capable of settlement by arbitration under the law for the time being in force of (ii) the arbitral award is in conflict with the public policy of India. Explanation--Without prejudice to the generality of Sub-clause (ii), it is hereby declared, for the avoidance of any doubt, that an award is in conflict with the public policy of India if the making of the award was induced or affected by fraud of corruption or was in violation of Section 75 or Section 81." 

 

In the matter of ONGC versus Saw Pipe Ltd (AIR 2003 SC 2629) the Supreme Court enumerated the purpose and requirements of Section 34 of the Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996. 

The Court held that: 

“5. For our purpose, it is not necessary to refer to the scope of self explanatory Clauses (i) to (iv) of Sub-section (2)(a) of Section 34 of the Act and it does not require elaborate discussion. However, Clause (v) of Sub-section 2(a) and Clause (ii) of Sub-section 2(b) require consideration. For proper adjudication of the question of jurisdiction, we shall first consider what meaning could be assigned to the term "Arbitral Procedure". 'ARBITRAL PROCEDURE' The ingredients of Clause (v) are as under:- 1) The Court may set aside the award:-- (i) (a) if the composition of the arbitral Tribunal was not in accordance with the agreement of the parties, (b) failing such agreement, the composition of the arbitral tribunal was not in accordance with Part-I of the Act. (ii) if the arbitral procedure was not in accordance with:- a) the agreement of the parties, or b) failing such agreement, the arbitral procedure was not in accordance with Part-I of the Act. 

6. However, exception for setting aside the award on the ground of composition of arbitration tribunal or illegality of arbitral procedure is that the agreement should not be in conflict with the provisions of Part-I of the Act from which parties cannot derogate. 

7. In the aforesaid Sub-clause (v), the emphasis is on the agreement and the provisions of Part-I of the Act from which parties cannot derogate. It means that the composition of arbitral tribunal should be in accordance with the agreement, Similarly, the procedure which is required to be followed by the arbitrator should also be in accordance with the agreement of the parties. If there is no such agreement then it should be in accordance with the procedure prescribed in the Part-I of the Act i.e. Sections 2 to 43. At the same time, agreement for composition of arbitral tribunal or arbitral procedure should not be in conflict with the provisions of the Act from which parties cannot derogate. Chapter V of the Part-I of the Act provides for conduct of arbitral proceedings. Section 18 mandates that parties to the arbitral proceedings shall be treated with equality and each party shall be given full opportunity to present his case. Section 19 sepcifically provides that arbitral is not bound by the Code of civil Procedure, 1908 or the Indian Evidence Act, 1872 and parties are free to agree on the procedure to be followed by the arbitral tribunal in conducting its proceedings. Failing any agreement between the parties subject to other provisions of Part-1, the arbitral tribunal is to conduct the proceedings in the manner it considers appropriate. This power includes the power to determine the admissibility, relevance, the materiality and weight of any evidence. Section 20, 21, and 22 deal with place of arbitration, commencement of arbitral proceedings and language respectively. Thereafter, Sections 23, 24 and 25 deal with statements of claim and defence, hearing and written proceedings and procedure to be followed in case of default of a party. 

8. At this stage, we would refer to Section 24 which is as under:-- "24. Hearings and written proceedings-- (1) Unless otherwise agreed by the parties, the arbitral tribunal shall decide whether to hold oral hearings for the presentation of evidence or for oral argument, or whether the proceedings shall be conducted on the basis of documents and other materials; Provided that the arbitral tribunal shall hold oral hearings, at an appropriate stage of the proceedings, on a request by a party, unless the parties have agreed that no oral hearing shall be held. (2) The parties shall be given sufficient advance notice of any hearing and of any meeting of the arbitral tribunal for the purposes of inspection of documents, goods or other property. (3) All statements, documents or other information supplied to or applications made to the arbitral tribunal by one party shall be communicated to the other party, and any expert report or evidentiary document on which the arbitral tribunal may rely in making its decision shall be communicated to the parties." 

9. Thereafter Chapter VI deals with making of arbitral award and termination of proceedings. Relevant Sections which require consideration are Sections 28 and 31. Sections 28 and 31 read as under:-- "28. Rules applicable to substance of dispute- (1) Where the place of arbitration is situate in India-- (a) in an arbitration other than an international commercial arbitration, the arbitral tribunal shall decide the dispute submitted to arbitration in accordance with the substantive law for the time being in force in India; (b) in international commercial arbitration,-- (i) the arbitral tribunal shall decide the dispute in accordance with the rules of law designated by the parties as applicable to the substance of the dispute; (ii) any designation by the parties of the law or legal system of a given country shall be construed, unless otherwise expressed, as directly referring to the substantive law of that country and not to its conflict of law rules; (iii) failing any designation of the law under Clause (a) by the parties, the arbitral tribunal shall apply the rules of law it considers to be appropriate given all the circumstances surrounding the dispute. (2) The arbitral tribunal shall decide ex aequo et bono or as amiable compositor only if the parts have expressly authorised it to do so. (3) In all cases, the arbitral tribunal shall decide in accordance with the terms of the contract and shall take into account the usages of the trade applicable to the transaction. 31. Form and contents of arbitral award--(1) An arbitral award shall be made in writing and shall be signed by the members of the arbitral tribunal. (2) For the purposes of Sub-section (1), in arbitral proceedings with more than one arbitrator, the signatures of the majority of all the members of the arbitral tribunal shall be sufficient so long as the reason for any omitted signature is stated. (3) The arbitral tribunal shall state the reasons upon which it is based, unless- (a) the parties have agreed that no reasons are to be given, or (b) the award is an arbitral award on agreed terms under Section 30, (4) The arbitral award shall state its date and the place of arbitration as determined in accordance with Section 20 and the award shall be deemed to have been made at that place. (5) After the arbitral award is made, a signed copy shall be delivered to each party. (6) The arbitral tribunal may, at any time during the arbitral proceedings, make an interim arbitral award on any matter with respect to which it may make a final arbitral award. (7)(a). Unless otherwise agreed by the parties, where and in so far as an arbitral award is for the payment of money, the arbitral tribunal may include in the sum for which the award is made interest, at such rate as it deems reasonable, on the whole or any part of the money, for the whole or any part of the period between the date on which the cause of action arose and the date on which the award is made. (b) A sum directed to be paid by an arbitral award shall, unless the award otherwise directs. carry interest at the rate of eighteen per centum per annum from the date of the award to the date of payment. (8) Unless otherwise agreed by the parties,-- (a) the costs of an arbitration shall be fixed by the arbitral tribunal; (b) the arbitral tribunal shall specify,-- (i) the party entitled to costs, (ii) the party who shall pay the costs, (iii) the amount of cots or method of determining that amount, and (iv) the manner in which the costs shall be paid. Explanation: For the purpose of Clause (a), "costs" means reasonable costs relating to,-- (i) the fees and expenses of the arbitrators and witnesses. (ii) legal fees and expenses, (iii) any administration fees of the institution supervising the arbitration, and (iv) any other expenses incurred in connection with the arbitral proceedings and the arbitral award." 

10. The aforesaid provisions prescribe the procedure to be followed by the arbitral tribunal coupled with its powers. Power and procedure are synonymous in the present case. By prescribing the procedure, the arbitral tribunal is empowered and is required to decide the dispute in accordance with the provisions of the Act, that is to say, the jurisdiction of the tribunal to decide the dispute is prescribed. In these sections there is no distinction between the jurisdiction power and the procedure. In Harish Chandra Bajpai v. Trilok Singh [1957]1SCR370 , while dealing with Sections 90 and 92 of the Representation of the People Act, 1951 (as it stood), this Court observed thus:-- "It is then argued that Section 92 confers powers on the Tribunal in respect of certain matters, while Section 90(2) applies the CPC in respect of matters relating to procedure that there is a distinction between power and procedure, and that the granting of amendment being a power and not a matter of procedure, it can be claimed only under Section 92 and not under Section 90(2). We do not see any antithesis between 'procedure' in Section 90(2) and 'powers' under Section 92. When the respondent applied to the Tribunal for amendment, he took a procedural step, and that he was clearly entitled to do under Section 90(2). The question of power arises only with reference to the order to be passed on the petition by the Tribunal. Is it to be held that the presumption of a petition is competent, but the passing of any order thereon is not? We are of opinion that there is no substance in the contention either." 

11. Hence, the jurisdiction or the power of the tribunal is prescribed under the Act and if the award is de hors the said provisions, it would be, on the face of it, illegal. The decision of the Tribunal must be within the bounds of its jurisdiction conferred under the Act or the contract. In exercising jurisdiction, the arbitral tribunal can not act in breach of some provision of substantive law or the provisions of the Act. 

12. The question, therefore, which requires consideration is-- whether the award could be set aside, if the arbitral tribunal has not followed the mandatory procedure prescribed under Sections 24, 28 or 31(3), which affects the rights of the parties" Under Sub-section (1)(a) of Section 28 there is a mandate to the arbitral tribunal to decide the dispute in accordance with the substantive law for the time being in force in India. Admittedly, substantive law would include the Indian contract Act, the Transfer of Property Act and other such laws in force. Suppose, if the award is passed in violation of the provisions of the Transfer of Property Act or in violation of the Indian Contract Act, the question would -- whether such award could be set aside? Similarly, under Sub-section (3), arbitral tribunal is directed to decide the dispute in accordance with the terms of the contract and also after taking into account the usage of the trade applicable to the transaction. If arbitral tribunal ignores the terms of the contract or usage of the trade applicable to the transaction, whether the said award could be interfered? Similarly, if the award is non-speaking one and is in violation of Section 31(3), can such award be set aside? IN our view, reading Section 34 conjointly with other provisions of the Act, it appeals that the legislative intent could not be that if the award is in contravention of the provisions of the Act, still however, it couldn't be set aside by the Court. If it is held that such award could not be interfered, it would be contrary to basic concept of justice. If the arbitral tribunal has not followed the mandatory procedure prescribed under the Act, it would mean that it has acted beyond its jurisdiction and thereby the award would be patently illegal which could be set aside under Section 34. 

13. The aforesaid interpretation of the Clause (v) would be in conformity with the settled principle of law that the procedural law cannot fail to provide relief when substantive law gives the right. Principle is -- there cannot be any wrong without a remedy. In M.V. Elisabeth and Ors. Harwan Investment & Trading Pvt. Ltd. [1992]1SCR1003 this Court observed that where substantive law demands justice for the party aggrieved and the statute has not provided the remedy, it is the duty of the Court to devise procedure by drawing analogy from other systems of law and practice. Similarly, in Dhanna Lal v. Kalawatibi and Ors. [2002]SUPP1SCR19 this Court observed that wrong must not be left unredeemed and right not left unenforced. 

14. Result is -- if the award is contrary to the substantive provisions of law or the provisions of the Act or against the terms of the contract, it would be patently illegal, which could be interfered under Section 34. However, such failure of procedure should be patent affecting the rights of the parties. WHAT MEANING COULD BE ASSIGNED TO THE PHRASE 'PUBLIC POLICY OF INDIA'? 

15. The next clause which requires interpretation is Clause (ii) of Sub-section 2(b) of Section 34 which inter alia provides that the Court may set aside arbitral award if it is in conflict with the 'Public Policy of India'. The phrase 'Public Policy of India' is not defined under the Act. Hence, the said term is required to be given meaning in context and also considering the purpose of the section and scheme of the Act. It has been repeatedly stated by various authorities that the expression 'public policy' does not admit of precise definition and may vary from generation to generation and from time to time. Hence, the concept 'public policy' is considered to be vague, susceptible to narrow or wider meaning depending upon the context in which it is used. Lacking precedent the Court has to give its meaning in the light and principles underlying the Arbitration Act, Contract Act and Constitutional provisions. 

16. For this purpose, we would refer to few decisions referred to by the learned counsel for the parties. While dealing with the concept of public policy, this Court in Central Inland Water Transport Corporation Limited and Anr. v. Brojo Nath Ganguly and Anr. (1986)IILLJ171SC has observed thus:-- "92. The Indian Contract Act does not define the expression "public policy" or "opposed to public policy". From the very nature of things, the expressions "public policy", "opposed to public policy", or "contrary to public policy" are incapable of precise definition. Public policy, however, is not the policy of a particular government. It connotes some matter which concerns the public good and the public interest. The concept of what is for the public good or in the public interest or what would be injurious or harmful to the public good or the public interest has varied from time to time. As new concepts take the place of old, transactions which were once considered against public policy are now being upheld by the courts and similarly where there has been a well recognised head of public policy, the courts have not shirked from extending it to the new transactions and changed circumstances and have at times not even flinched from inventing a new head of public policy. There are two schools of though -- "the narrow view" school and "the broad view" school. According to the former, courts cannot create new heads of public policy whereas the latter countenances judicial law-making in this area. The adherents of the "the narrow view" school would not invalidate a contract on the ground of public policy unless that particular ground had been well established by authorities. Hardly ever has the voice of the timorous spoken more clearly and loudly than in these words of Lord Davey in Janson v. Driefontein Consolidated Gold Mines Ltd.(1902) AC 484: "Public Policy is always an unsafe and treacherous ground for legal decision". That was in the year 1902. Seventy-eight years earlier, Burrough, J., in Richardson v. Mellish (1824) 2 Bing 229 described public policy as "a very unruly horse, and when once you get astride it you never know where it will carry you." The Master of the Rolls Lord Denning, however, was not a man to shy away from unmanageable horse and in words which conjure up before our eyes the picture of the young Alexander the Great laming Bucephalus, he said in Enderby Town Football Club Ltd. v. Football Assn. Ltd. (1971) Ch. 591; "with a good man in the saddle, the unruly horse can be kept in control. It can jump over obstacles". Had the timorous always held the field, not only the doctrine of public policy but even the Common Law or the principles of Equity would never have evolved. Sir William Holdsworth in his "History of English Law", Volume III, page 55, has said: In fact, a body of law like the common law, which has grown up gradually with the growth of the nation. necessarily acquires some fixed principles, and if it is to maintain these principles it must be able, on the ground of public policy or some other like ground, to suppress practices which, under ever new disguises seek to weaken or negative them. It is thus clear that the principles governing public policy must be and are capable, on proper occasion, of expansion or modification. Practices which were considered perfectly normal at one time have today become obnoxious and oppressive to public conscience. If there is no head of public policy which covers a case, then the court must in consonance with public conscience. and in keeping with public good and public interest declare such practice to be opposed to public policy. Above all, in deciding any case which may not be covered by authority our courts have before them the beacon light of the Preamble to the Constitution. Lacking precedent, the court can always be guided by that light and the principles underlying the Fundamental Rights and the Directive Principles enshrined in our Constitution. 93. The normal rule of Common Law has been that a party who seeks to enforce an agreement which is opposed to public policy will be non-suited. The case of A. Schroeder Music Public Co. Ltd. v. Macaulay (1974) 1 WLR 1308, however, establishes that where a contract is vitiated as being contrary to public policy, the party adversely affected by it can sue to have it declared void. The case may be different where the purpose of the contract is illegal or immoral. In Kedar Nath Motani v. Prahlad Rai [1960]1SCR861 , reversing the High Court and restoring the decree passed by the trial court declaring the appellants' tile to the lands in suit and directing the respondents who were the appellants' benamidars to restore possession, this Court, after discussing the English and Indian law on the subject, said (at page 873): The correct position in law, in our opinion, is that what one has to see is whether the illegality goes so much to the root of the matter the plaintiff cannot bring his action without relying upon the illegal transaction into which he had entered. If the illegality be trivial or venial, as stated by Williston and the plaintiff is not required to rest his case upon that illegality, then public policy demands that the defendant should not be allowed to take advantage of the position. A strict view, of course, must be taken of the plaintiff's conduct, and he should not be allowed to circumvent the illegality by resorting to some subterfuge or by misstating the facts. If, however, the matter is clear and the illegality is not required to be pleaded or proved as part of the cause of action and the plaintiff recanted before the illegal purpose was achieved. then, unless it be of such a gross nature as to outrage the conscience of the court, the plea of the defendant should not prevail. The type of contract to which the principle formulated by us above applies are not contracts which are tainted with illegality but are contracts which contain terms which are so unfair and unreasonable that they shock the conscience of the court. They are opposed to public policy and require to be adjudged void." 

17. Further, in Renusagar Power Co. Ltd. v. General Electric Co. AIR 1994 SC 860 , this Court considered Section 7(1) of the Arbitration (Protocol and Convention) Act, 1937 which inter alia provided that a foreign award may not be enforced under the said Act, if the Court dealing with the case is satisfied that the enforcement of the award will be contrary to the Public Policy. After elaborate discussion, the Court arrived at the conclusion that Public Policy comprehended in Section 7(1)(b)(ii) of the Foreign Awards (Recognition and Enforcement) Act, 1961 is the 'Public Policy of India' and does not cover the public policy of any other country. For giving meaning to the term 'Public Policy', the Court observed thus:-- "66. Article V(2)(b) of the New York Convention of 1958 and Section 7(1)(b)(ii) of the Foreign Awards Act do not postulate refusal of recognition and enforcement of a foreign award on the ground that it is contrary to the law of the country of enforcement and the ground of challenge is confined to the recognition and enforcement being contrary to the public policy of the country in which the award is set to be enforced. There is nothing to indicate that the expression "public policy" in Article V(2)(b) of the New York Convention and Section 7(1)(b)(ii) of the Foreign Awards Act is not used in the same sense in which it was used in Article I(c) of the Geneva Convention of 1927 and Section 7(1) of the Protocol and Convention Act of 1937. This would mean that "public policy" in Section 7(1)(b)(ii) has been used in a narrower sense and in order to attract to bar of public policy the enforcement of the award must invoke something more than the violation of the law of India. Since the Foreign Awards Act is concerned with recognition and enforcement of foreign awards which are governed by the principles of private international law, the expression "public policy" in Section 7(1)(b)(ii) of the Foreign Awards Act must necessarily be construed in the sense the doctrine of public policy is applied in the field of private international law. Applying the said criteria it must be held that the enforcement of a foreign award would be refused on the ground that it is contrary to public policy if such enforcement would be contrary to (i) fundamental policy of Indian law; or (ii) the interests of India; or (iii) justice or morality." The Court finally held that:-- "76. Keeping in view the aforesaid objects underlying FERA and the principles governing enforcement of exchange control laws followed in other countries, we are of the view that the provisions contained in FERA have been enacted to safeguard the economic interests of India and any violation of the said provisions would be contrary to the public policy of India as envisaged in Section 7(1)(b)(ii) of the Act." 

18. This Court in Murlidhar Agarwal and Anr. v. State of U.P. and Ors. [1975]1SCR575 while dealing with the concept of 'public policy' observed thus:-- "31. Public policy does not remain static in any given community. It may vary from generation to generation and even in the same generation. Public policy would be almost useless if it were to remain in fixed moulds for all time. 32. ...The difficulty of discovering what public policy is at any given moment certainly does not absolve the Judges from the duty of doing so. In conducting an enquiry, as already stated, Judges are not hide-bound by precedent. The Judges must look beyond the narrow field of past precedents, though this still leaves open the question, in which direction they must cast their gaze. The Judges are to base their decision on the opinions of men of the world, as distinguished from opinions based on legal learning. In other words, the Judges will have to look beyond the jurisprudence and that in so doing, they must consult not their own personal standards or predilections but those of the dominant opinion at a given moment, or what has been termed customary morality. The Judges must consider the social consequences of the rule propounded, especially in the light of the factual evidence available as to its probable results. .... The point is rather that this power must be lodged somewhere and under and if they have to fulfil their function as Judges, it could hardly be lodged elsewhere." 

Through judgment the Supreme Court has enlarged the scope of interference of Civil Courts, with Arbitral award.  Amongst other grounds, main ground under which an award can be assailed is violation of public policy and through this judgment the Supreme Court has widened arena of Public Policy.

The principle emerging from the abovesaid judgment can be enumerated as below:

(1)The Court can set aside the arbitral award under Section 34(2) of the Act if the party making the application furnishes proof that:--

(i) a party was under some incapacity, or

(ii) the arbitration agreement is not valid under the law to which the parties have subjected it or, failing any indication thereon, under the law for the time being in force; or

(iii) the party making the application was not given proper notice of the appointment of an arbitrator or of the arbitral proceedings or was otherwise unable to present his case; or

(iv) the arbitral award deals with a dispute not contemplated by or not falling within the terms of the submission to arbitration, or it contains decisions on matters beyond the scope of the submission to arbitration;

2) The Court may set aside the award:--

(i) (a) if the composition of the arbitral tribunal was not in accordance with the agreement of the parties,

(b) failing such agreement, the composition of the arbitral tribunal was not in accordance with Part-I of the Act.

(ii) if the arbitral procedure was not in accordance with:--

(a) the agreement of the parties, or

(b) failing such agreement, the arbitral procedure was not in accordance with Part-I of the Act.

However, exception for setting aside the award on the ground of composition of arbitral tribunal or illegality of arbitral procedure is that the agreement should not be in conflict with the provisions of Part-I of the Act from which parties cannot derogate.

(c) If the award passed by the arbitral tribunal is in contravention of provisions of the Act or any other substantive law governing the parties or is against the terms of the contract.

(3) The award could be set aside if it is against the public policy of India, that is to say, if it is contrary to:--

(a) fundamental policy of Indian law;

(b) the interest of India; or

(c) justice or morality, or

(d) if it is patently illegal.

 (4) It could be challenged:--

(a) as provided under Section 13(5); and

(b) Section 16(6) of the Act.

 


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